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Damson - What we're watching... #11

Damson - What we're watching... #11
 

 
Amazon went a little under the radar with the release of "Modern Love" on its Prime Video streaming network. A couple of trailers on YouTube and then Boom, there it was, all eight episodes available for anyone with a Prime subscription to view.
 
 
While it is has been a little bit of a slow burn, before long everyone will have seen it, or at least know all about it. With a pretty starry cast that includes Anne Hathaway, Dev Patel and Tina Fey amongst others, it's pretty difficult to ignore.
 
 
So then, the real question: Is it any good??
 
 
For the most part, yes it is.
 
 
Based on a long-running series of articles published in the New York Times, Modern Love is an Anthology series of eight different stories, each taking up an episode of usually somewhere between 30 and 40 minutes. As you would probably expect from the title, each story revolves around love in its many different forms. 
 
 
As you would probably expect, not every episode lands as it should. The first couple are beautifully heart warming, but episode three which details Anne Hathaway's character's struggle with Bi-Polar disorder and the effect it has on her ability to hold down a relationship, is a real misfire. Not that there is anything wrong with Hathaway's performance, far from it. Somewhere between a tribute to La La Land and her turn in "Love And other Drugs", she gives it her all. The problem is that the subject matter seems almost rushed. I guess it's to be expected when they try to condense a detailed story into 30ish minute bite size chunks. It deserved more time.
 
 
For us, episode two was the true stand out. It tells the story of a young software developer mogul, Joshua, (played by the always great Dev Patel) being interviewed by reporter Julie (played by Catherine Keener) about the dating app he has created. These two develop an easy rapport and an incredibly sweet platonic relationship while sharing with each other stories of their great loves. The episode doesn't linger too long on the pain they have both experienced, instead focusing on their past happiness. The result is an incredibly charming episode.
 
 
There have been comparisons made to Netflix's Easy, which was another anthology series based around love and relationships. It has to be said though, this is just not as good. It certainly is more wholesome though.
 
 
For the most part, rattling through all eight of these episodes (easily done in an evening) is a pleasure. Yes, it is sometimes a little too schmaltzy, and yes, the backdrop is often a mirror image of every Woody Allen movie, but if you want something that is easy to watch and gives you a warm fuzzy feeling, you can do a lot worse than tucking into this sickly sweet treat.
 
 
If you really love it too, great news! It's been renewed for a second series already. Hopefully, no Ed Sheeren cameos this time though.